End of Equality

A book you have been waiting for!

A book that joins the dots between neoliberalism and sexism, between equal pay, war zones, the veil, The Wire, the web and welfare states…a new way of thinking about where we’re at.

Among liberal thinkers, there is an optimistic belief that men and women are on a cultural journey toward equality – in the workplace, on the street, and in the home. But observation and evidence both tell us that in many ways this progress has stopped – and in some cases even reversed. In “The End of Equality”, renowned feminist Beatrix Campbell argues that even as the patriarchy has lost some of its legitimacy, new inequalities are emerging in our culture. We are living, Campbell writes, in an era of neopatriarchy in which violence has proliferated; body anxiety and self-hatred have flourished; rape is committed with impunity; sex trafficking thrives; and the struggle for equal pay is at an end. After four decades observing society, Campbell still speaks of the long-sought goal of gender equality. But now she calls for a new revolution.

End of Equality by Beatrix Campbell

Click to buy at Foyles…

Here’s Bea talking about End of Equality at a Taking Soundings event in Leeds, March 2014.

5 thoughts on “End of Equality

  1. angela sands

    Vintage Bea! She puts the light in the right spot to show the true nature of sexism. A woman of great merit educating us to see deeply what is true and important! Congratulations and thanks Beatrice!

  2. Carmen

    Can’t wait to see Beatrix Campbell deliver a lecture on this book in a couple of weeks, I’m hoping to include the experience in an upcoming blog of mine.

  3. Sandeep

    Bea, I was fortunate enough to hear you speak about The End of Equality at Coventry University on Thursday, it was a fascinating and thought-provoking . I wondered what your thoughts are on marriage in relation to inequalities between the sexes. I recently heard Spike Peterson deliver a lecture on how the institution of marriage breeds race, gender, class and economic inequality, do women unwittingly disenfranchise themselves when they enter into marriage? Also, I wanted to mention links between the financial crisis and domestic violence, how incidents of domestic violence increase in households who are experiencing financial hardship or if one partner (especially the man) loses their job.


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